Chat with us, powered by LiveChat HUM 1020 Virtual Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Research Essay Worksheet | Gen Paper
+1(978)310-4246 credencewriters@gmail.com
  

Online Aesthetic Virtual Experience Options
During the current pandemic you will not be required to attend a museum, so this
assignment will NOW be an online experience. This is the approved list of online
museum resources to complete this assignment. Select ONE online museum and then
select a specific Art Work to analyze. Be sure to include the url for the art work in the
essay.
OPTIONAL: During the current pandemic you MAY want to physically attend a museum
even though this assignment will NOW be accepted as an online experience. However,
you may CHOOSE to attend a museum “in person”. But if you do (not required), then
you are assuming all risks and responsibilities associated with attending. You are in no
way “required” to go anywhere “in person” for this course for the Aesthetic Experience
Essay or for any other reason. But, if you prefer to attend “in person”, there are some
pre-approved museums (in the Tampa Bay Area) listed below as well.
See directions in My Courses: HUM 1020
Approved Online “Virtual” Visits for the Aesthetic Experience Essay
Visit the British Museum
https://www.britishmuseum.org/
Explore this African Art Collection from the Smithsonian.
https://africa.si.edu/collections/start
See this Native American Collection from the Smithsonian.
https://americanindian.si.edu/explore/collections
Explore these collections at the Louvre Museum.
https://www.louvre.fr/en/departements
Visit these collections at the Uffizi Museum.
https://www.uffizi.it/en/the-uffizi
1
Explore the Metropolitan Museum of Art
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection
Visit the collections at the National Gallery of Art
https://www.nga.gov/collection.html
Explore French Museums
http://parismuseescollections.paris.fr/en
Explore the Museums of the Vatican
http://www.museivaticani.va/content/museivaticani/en/collezioni/musei.html
Explore the Farnsworth Museum

Home

They have a nice collection of Wyeth’s and are very accessible.
Approved Museums in the Tampa Bay area (to visit online or “optionally in
person”):

SPC’s Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art at the Tarpon Springs Campus (Free “in person” with
SPC ID). Call first to make sure if it is open. Otherwise, a virtual visit is fine.
https://www.leeparattner.org/

Museum of Fine Arts – http://fine-arts.org/

Free Link Info. to MFA only – http://www.pplc.us/mfa.shtml

Salvador Dali Museum – http://thedali.org/

Tampa Museum of Art – http://www.tampamuseum.org/

The Imagine Museum – https://www.imaginemuseum.com/
Links for other Approved Museums (do NOT use the Museum of Natural History as it does not
have art).
https://www.top10.com/virtual-museum-tours
2
3
VIRTUAL Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience
Research Essay Worksheet
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The student will be able to identify elements of style in various forms of western and/or non-western human creative expression.
The student will be able to apply a basic vocabulary essential for communicating concepts in the humanities disciplines.
The student will be able to identify how forms of Western and Non-Western human creative expressions reflect the human condition.
The student will be able to compare and contrast enduring contributions of individual artists, thinkers, and writers.
The student will be able to develop critical analysis skills in reference to works of human creative expression.
GRADING
See the assessment rubric attached to the Aesthetic Experience and Research Essay dropbox folder.
MATERIALS
Use all of the online module resources, your textbook, additional research sources, and the Visual Art Vocabulary and Principles at the
end of this document to guide your writing.
INSTRUCTIONS
For this assignment you VIRTUALLY attend an art museum ONLINE and select a piece of art to do research on and write
about. Then you will compare it to an artwork from our textbook and complete this worksheet.
1. Choose an art museum LINK from the approved list in My Courses. Be sure your selected Art meets the
following criteria:
• The museum you attend/view must be an art museum, not a science museum or a children’s museum.
• Try to upload a digital photograph of the Art. In any case, provide the url for the Art.
• If you experience difficulty finding an art museum near your location, contact your instructor (not applicable
during CV-19 Crisis)
2. Virtually visit your chosen art museum, and select a work of art. Suggestions:
• The work can be a painting, sculpture, photograph, mixed media, or any other medium exhibited in the
museum.
• You may wish to take a copy of this worksheet with you (or keep the document open for the Virtual Visit) to
the museum (website) in order to more carefully select a work of art.
3. Complete the “Essay Header” section in the designated space provided below.
4. Complete the “Art Work Information” section in the designated space provided below.
5. Complete the 3 Essay Prompts in the “Aesthetic Experience Research Essay” section in the designated
space provided below. Respond to the prompts using the following guidelines:
• Use full sentences and paragraphs in your responses.
• Use and incorporate relevant and genre-specific vocabulary for each prompt. Definitions of relevant
vocabulary are provided at the end of this document, in the online module resources, and in your textbook.
• Your completed essay responses should be a total of at least 600 words (at least 200 words per response).






Conduct the appropriate research to support your responses to the worksheet prompts. Be sure to
cite all sources carefully. For this assignment, you are required to use and cite a minimum of five
quality sources (including the precise link to your work of art). Those five sources should include:
(1) the textbook;
(2) the website of the museum that houses your piece;
(3) the precise link to the work of art itself;
(4 and 5) TWO quality research sources pertaining to your piece, its artist, style, and/or
historical/cultural contexts. To find these sources, please try using Google Scholar and/or our college
library.
Be sure to cite all your sources in proper MLA or APA format, including the event or work of art
itself. Your complete “Works Cited” should be placed at the end of your third essay prompt; in other
1
words, at the bottom of the page on which you write your responses to the third essay prompt (before
the Glossary section).”
6. Submit your completed Museum Visit Aesthetic Experience Worksheet to the Aesthetic Experience
Research Essay dropbox folder.
ESSAY HEADER
Student Full Name
Name of Museum
Location/URL of Museum
Date of Virtual Museum Visit
2
Digital
Photograph
of the Art
and/or URL
3
ART WORK INFORMATION
Title
Artist
Creation Date
Discipline Classification
How is the selection classified in
the Humanities? Is it Literature,
Visual Art, Music, Theater, Musical
Stage, or other?
Genre, Time Period, Style
What type of art is it? Is it a
painting, sculpture, photograph,
mixed media, or other? Is it
classical, impressionism, abstract,
cubism, modernism, etc.?
Medium
What is this work constructed
from? What type of materials are
used?
Size & Effect of Size
What is the size of the work? Do
you believe that the size has any
impact upon the way that you react
to this piece? How?
Social, Historical, and/or
Cultural Origin
Briefly describe the Cultural
Origins and/or the Social and
Historical relevance of your
selected artwork
Western or Non-western
Humanities Classification
Based on the social, historical, and
cultural contexts: Would you
classify this work as Western or
Non-Western? Based on your
research
and
observations,
provide reasons and evidence
supporting
your
classification
claim.
4
AESTHETIC EXPERIENCE RESEARCH ESSAY
Prompt 1
Using the space provided below, analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least 200 words
using the following guidelines:
• Identify the most significant art principles that were used in the work of art, using at least three relevant and
genre-specific vocabulary words, clearly describing how the artist used them. Provide a minimum of three
specific, descriptive details to support the use of each selected art principle.
• Select two adjectives describing the overall mood of the piece (stay away from vague terms such as amazing,
awesome, excellent, etc.). Give a minimum of two specific/descriptive details to support your claims.
• Use, cite, and incorporate at least one quality research source pertaining to your piece, its artist, style, and/or
historical/cultural contexts. To find these sources, please try using Google Scholar and/or our college library.
5
Prompt 2
Using the space provided below, further analyze the work of art in at least two fully developed paragraphs with at least
200 words using the following guidelines:
• Describe the main social, historical, and cultural contexts of the work? Refer to your responses in the “Art Work
Information” section above.
• Describe the primary purpose of the art work.
• Describe the main artistic statement.
• Describe how the work reflects the human condition, or how it communicates as a “human, creative expression.”
• Use, cite, and incorporate at least one quality research source beyond the textbook in this section also.
6
Prompt 3
Using the space provided below, compare the work of art with another work of art from your textbook in at least two fully
developed paragraphs with at least 200 words using the following guidelines:
• Select and identify another work of art from your textbook that is similar to the work of art that you selected from
the museum. In most cases, the works of art in your textbook are considered masterpieces.
• Explain three qualities that the work from the museum shares with the work from the textbook, with specific
examples to support your argument.
• Based on your comparison, explain whether or not the work of art from the museum is a masterpiece or might
become a masterpiece, using specific examples to support your decision.
• Use and cite at least one quality research source beyond the textbook in this section also. Be sure that TWO
quality research sources pertaining to your piece, its artist, style, and/or historical/cultural context has been used.
Again, to find these sources, please try using Google Scholar and/or our college library.
• You should list ALL of the research sources (including our text book) at the end of this final essay prompt.
7
Visual Art Vocabulary and Principles
TERM
Abstract
DEFINITION
To simplify, rearrange or distort an image; a non- representational (non-realist) form of art.
Abstract Art
Art that takes from reality only what the artist wants or that renders a visual depiction of concepts in the
artist’s mind (phenomenal). Such art typically does not resemble the familiar world of regular (veridical)
perception.
Adjective
Words used to describe or modify nouns or pronouns. For example, red, quick, happy, and obnoxious are
adjectives because they can describe things—a red hat, the quick rabbit, a happy duck, an obnoxious
person.
Aesthetics
The study of the nature of beauty and art (including the study of human “response” to the “aesthetic
experience”). It is a significant branch of philosophy. The word “Aesthetics” is derived from the Greek word
meaning “sense perception”.
Aesthetic
Experience
Having an experience in the arts (broadly) such as viewing art, stage productions (like theater, dance, etc.),
or viewing and listening to music (like concerts, opera, singing, etc.), or reading literature and philosophy,
that we value intrinsically. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 1, page 15
Background
The part of a pictorial representation that appears to be in the distance. The general scene or surface
against which designs, patterns or figures are viewed.
Balance
A principle of art that is concerned with the sense of stability of the visual elements. There are three types of
balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical and radial.
Catharsis
A healthy release of pent up emotion. This can occur as a result of an aesthetic experience.
Chiaroscuro
Italian term in painting utilizing light and dark contrast to create the effect of modeling a figure or object. It
enhances the effect of depth.
Classicism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Collage
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Content
The message or subject the work communicates. The content can relate to the subject matter or be an idea
or emotion. Theme is another word used for content in humanities.
Context
In humanities, the environment, background, or special circumstances in terms of which a given work is best
understood. Social, historical, and cultural context is the identification of political/social arrangements,
philosophical ideas, values, styles, and cultural identity of a particular time period in which a selected work is
influenced by or may be attempting to express. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Contrast
A principle of art that uses the differences between the visual elements to create variety, emphasis or
interest. Contrast in value is the difference between light and dark.
Cool Colors
Colors such as purples, blues and greens that produce the impression of coolness.
Cubism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Discipline
(1) in the humanities, a given art form (such as literature, visual art, music, theater, musical stage, and
others) that attempts to create and express the human condition; (2) in academia, a given department or
area of study (like science, history, philosophy, and others).
Eastern
Humanities
Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural
contexts of one of (broadly) Asia, Africa, Middle East, Indigenous Peoples of all continents (except Europe),
and Oceania. Narrowly: China, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Pacific Islands, Native America,
Aborigines, and Mesoamerica. See also Non-Western Humanities.
Focal area
A principle of art that stresses one element of art; defines a center of interest or draws attention to certain
areas with a work of art.
Foreground
The part of a scene or picture that is nearest to and in front of the viewer.
Form
The visual element that is three-dimensional; having height, width and depth.
Fresco
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Genre (broadly in
the humanities)
a distinct category within a discipline (e.g. categories in film, literature, art, music, musical stage, etc.).
EXAMPLE: Poetry is a genre of Literature. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 4, page 99
Genre subject
In art, a scene or a person from everyday life, depicted realistically and without religious or symbolic
significance.
8
TERM
Golden Section
DEFINITION
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Gothic
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Human Condition
Encompasses the uniqueness and totality of the inner experience of “being human”. It is often focused on
the ultimate concerns of human existence. Various disciplines in the humanities attempt to express this
experience.
Imitation
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Impressionism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Intensity
The degree of purity of a color. Deep colors have a high intensity.
Installation art
An art that creates an architectural tableau using objects drawn from and making reference to artistic
sources and everyday life.
Likeness
the reproduction in several humanities disciplines that is a conscious attempt to imitate reality in its
expression. See “Realism” and key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Line
A visual element that is the path of moving points through space; it has the properties of direction, width and
length.
Masterpiece
A work that in style, form, and execution far exceeds other works of its time. It is a human creation (e.g.
painting, novel, film, musical score) that continues to be relevant and/or admired by multiple generations. It
is a work that has a profound effect on humanity.
Media or Medium
the particular materials in which a given artist works. Also see key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page
150
Modernism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Movement
A principle of art used to guide a viewer’s eye throughout the work; a trend.
Negative space
Spaces surrounding shapes or forms in two- and three-dimensional art.
Non-Western
Humanities
Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural
contexts of one of (broadly) Asia, Africa, Middle East, Indigenous Peoples of all continents (except Europe),
and Oceania. Narrowly: China, India, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Pacific Islands, Native America,
Aborigines, and Mesoamerica. See also Eastern Humanities.
Pattern
Repetition of elements or motif.
Perspective
A formula for projecting the illusion of three- dimensional space onto a two-dimensional surface.
Phenomenological
Perception
A perception that exists in your mind as a result of (1) mind internally produced, mind internal causation (like
hearing your favorite song while no music is playing), or (2) the mental image (in your mind) that is produced
as a result of a veridical perception as it is happening (like seeing color while viewing a painting).
Pop Art
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Positive space
Shapes or forms in two-dimensional and three- dimensional art.
Post
Impressionism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Post Modernism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Proportion
A principle of art concerned with the relationships in size, one part to another or to the whole.
Psychological
Realism
Artist’s attempt to convey the inner life of the figure, subject, or protagonist. Also see key terms at the end of
Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Realism
(1) A style that focuses on the everyday lives of the middle and lower classes, portraying their world in
a serious, accurate, and unsentimental way; (2) a genre in several humanities disciplines that is a conscious
attempt to imitate reality in its expression (see “Likeness” also).
Renaissance
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Repetition
An art element repeated over and over that can produce visual rhythm.
Saturation
The strength of a hue – a vivid hue is of high saturation.
Scale
When proportional relationships are created relative to a specific unit of measurement.
9
TERM
Shape
DEFINITION
The visual element that has two-dimensions: height and width; a space with a defined or implied boundary.
Two basic groups: geometric and organic.
Super-Realism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Surrealism
See key terms at the end of Chapter 5 (Art), page 150
Symbol
A visual image that represents something other than itself.
Symmetry
The balance of like forms and colors on opposite sides of the vertical axis of a composition.
Theme
The message or subject the work communicates. The theme can relate to the subject matter or be an idea
or emotion. Content is another word used for theme in humanities.
Texture
The visual element that refers to the way something feels or looks like it feels and can be actual or
implied.
Unity
A principle of art that is concerned with the sense of wholeness or completeness.
Vanishing point
in linear perspective – the point on the horizon at which the receding parallel lines appear to converge and
then vanish.
Veridical
Perception
A perception caused by something outside of your mind (e.g. light waves striking your eyes causing an
image in your brain). This is a perception caused by a sensory experience (like viewing a painting).
Warm colors
Colors such as reds, oranges, yellows and browns that produce the impression of warmth.
Western
Humanities
Creative expressions in one of the disciplines of humanities exhibited in the social, historical, and cultural
contexts of European civilization or by civilizations heavily influenced by European immigration and
colonization. In most cases these Western cultures trace significant belief systems and history to Ancient
Greece. Broadly: Europe, and Non-Indigenous United States, Canada, and Australia.
10

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

error: Content is protected !!