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Introduction

The good news about doing an annotated bibliography is that there are tons of resources on the internet to help you out. I’ll link a bunch below for you to peruse at your own pace. Annotated bibliographies are not the same thing as regular bibliographies. A few things to remember specific to this annotated bibliography:

1) You should have at least five sources. You will need more than five for the final paper, but five is sufficient for this project.

2) I don’t care if you use APA, MLA, Chicago or any other format for citations. Just make sure that (a) you use a recognizable form of citation and (b) that you are consistent throughout your assignment.

3) What makes an annotated bibliography different from a regular list of sources is that for each source you should be summarizing the source as well critically evaluating it. The idea is that if I were to write a paper on the same topic as you (hey, I might do that someday, you don’t know) then I should be able to read your annotation and decide “is this source useful to me and should I read it?”

Links For Annotated Bibliographies

The best link is probably this one: Link to UMUC Annotated Bibliography resourcehttp://sites.umuc.edu/library/libhow/bibliography_tutorial.cfm

Another one can be found here: Link to Notre Dame Annotated Bibliography resource https://libguides.library.nd.edu/annotated-bibliography

Both of the above have links to other places, but if you want one more, try out: Link to Purdue Annotated Bibliography Resource https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/614/01/

Finally, here are some samples from Cornell’s library website:

“The following example uses APA style (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition, 2010) for the journal citation:

Waite, L. J., Goldschneider, F. K., & Witsberger, C. (1986). Nonfamily living and the erosion of traditional family orientations among young adults. American Sociological Review, 51, 541-554.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

This example uses MLA style (MLA Handbook, 8th edition, 2016) for the journal citation:

Waite, Linda J., et al. “Nonfamily Living and the Erosion of Traditional Family Orientations Among Young Adults.” American Sociological Review, vol. 51, no. 4, 1986, pp. 541-554.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.”

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