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View Nexis Video Tutorials:View YouTube Video: ?Nexis Uni: Searching from the Home Page,? LexisNexis Nexis Solutions, (2017)View YouTube Video: ?Nexis Uni: How to Select Sources and Create Permalinks,? LexisNexis Nexis Solutions, (2017)View YouTube Video: ?Nexis Uni: How to Use the Advanced Search Form,? LexisNexis Nexis Solutions, (2017)View YouTube Video: ?Nexis Uni: How to Use the Citation Tool,? LexisNexis Nexis Solutions, (2018)RevisionofFactualAnalysisforProperCitation.docxBBR10CitationUSSupCtCaseMaruca2.pdfIntrodtotheBluebook.docxLegalCitation-ResearchOverview.docxLocating_the_Law_complete_5th_edition_2011.pdfFB81A18E-08C4-4C79-87C4-1A639826077B.pdfThis assignment is worth 30 points. Use the attached Rubric as a checklist to ensure successful completion of the assignment.DeliverablesA revision of the assignment from Unit 3, to add proper Bluebook citations.Step 1 Read and Review:?Legal Citation & Research: The Bluebook & Nexis Uni??Introduction to The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation??Proper Case Citation: United States Supreme Court Cases?View Bluebook Video Tutorials:?Bluebook Tutorial: Case Citations,? Georgetown Law Library, Georgetown Law, 2019, http://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/bluebook_tutorial/2?Bluebook Tutorial: Statutory Citations,? Georgetown Law Library, Georgetown Law, 2019, http://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/bluebook_tutorial/1?Bluebook Tutorial: Law Review Citations,? Georgetown Law Library, Georgetown Law, 2019, http://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/bluebook_tutorial/3Step 2 Download and Revise:Download a copy of your assignment from Unit 3.Revise the document, specifically your responses to questions 3-7, adding proper Bluebook citations.Upload the revised document.Tips to Successfully Complete the Assignment:Do not try to memorize Bluebook citation or any type of citation style. Work with a Bluebook resource next to you and take one citation at a time, taking the time to look up the proper citation format. It will be slow-going at first, but with time and practice, you will get very efficient.The lessons in this Unit are helpful resources to explain Bluebook citation. Another resource is: ?Bluebook Citation 101?Academic Format,? UC Libraries, University of Cincinnati (2019) https://guides.libraries.uc.edu/c.php?g=222758&p=1473412Rubric Bluebook Citation.docx,Proper Case Citation: United State Supreme Court Cases Reference: The Bluebook: A tJniform System of Citotion,20th Edition Susan Maruca, JD, MA, Director Paralegal Program, Eastern Gateway Community College Rule 10: CASES Citation of a United States Supreme Court case: Example: Gase Name: Board of Education of Independent School District #92 of Pottawatomie County v. Earls Nexis Uni Bluebook Citation tixport: @d. of Educ. v. Ear$_5.!Q_U.,9. 922-122_s_-cl-255s,1!3 _L.EL?q rqq,a0!L US. LEXIS 4!ga 10_? U,S.L.W. 4737,2002 Cal DailyOp. Service 5761,2002 DailyJournal DAR7275,15 Fla. L. Weekly Fed. S 483 (Supreme Court of the United States June 27 , 2002, Decided ), available at ht tp s : //adv a nce Jexr’s- com.egcc.ohionet.org/api/docutnent?collection=casesdrd=am:contentltem:4655-7780-0048-Y005- 00000-00&context= 1 51 6831 Commented ISM1l: Rule 10,2.1: “Use the case nan]e that appears at the beBinning of the opinion in the cited reporter.” Although Earls is not the only party in this matter (there are two students u,ho initiated the action): “Omit all oarties otherthan thefirst listed on each side Do notomit the first listed relator or any portion ofa partnership name ” Prooer Bluebook Citation: lao. ot roud. [,.] learElEs_Al]q.S$Z[bz6] kzooztl commented [sMz]: First Party Commented [SM3]: Verrsus = the abbrevi:rtion v (lower case v followed by a period) Commented [SM4]: second Party Commented [SM5]: The reporter is the nanre of the official book that contains the case. Here 536 is the volume number of this official collection of books hokling the Board of Education v, Earls case issued by the U.5, Supreme Court in 2002. Therefore, as of the time of the publiEtion of this case, there were 536 volumes of reporters in this collection Commented [SM5]: This is the name of the reporler referenced Ebove containing 536 volumes of cases issued by the U.S. Supreme Court -lhe full name ofthis reporter is U.5. Reports but in the Bluebook citation we only use the abbreviation U.s Commented [SM7]: First page ofthe case in the reporter. Commented [SM8]: This is the specific page thatyou are referring to when you reference information in a case. Using the first page ofthe case is notsufficient in the practice of law. You must be precise in terms of where you found the information Commented [SM9]: Date of decision Usually, therre would be a designation of which court heard i;he ca:ie in Darenthesis but because it is clear from the name ol the reoorterthat it is the U.5, Supreme Court, th?n that information is not included with the date of the decision This document is checked for acr:essibility pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act,Introduction to The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation Style Guides: A style book or style guide is a resource that directs exactly how to format documents and cite outside sources used for research and writing (for example, MLA, APA). The goal is to create a universal finished product that a practitioner can read through easily. Practitioners read each other?s work so that they can gain a better understanding of their own professional activity. This way, research and writing doesn?t have to start from the very beginning but is just a continuation of the professional conversation about a topic. Beyond collaboration and the sharing of information, style guides and citation ensure that credit is given when information is obtained from outside sources. Taking information without providing proper citations constitutes plagiarism and a document that lacks evidence or writing that is not researched-based. The Bluebook: The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation is a style guide that is the most widely used system of legal citation in the legal community of the United States. It is typically referred to as the Bluebook. The Bluebook style of citation includes a uniform system used by law practitioners to site case law, statutory law and other legislative materials, state constitutions, the United States Constitution, administrative law, and legal books or reports, journals, magazines, digital/Internet Sources and international materials. While the Bluebook covers both state and federal law, some courts require their own system of citation that takes precedence over the Bluebook system of citation. While the Bluebook includes how to United States Supreme Court cases, the United States Supreme Court writes its opinions using its own system of citation. The Bluebook can be divided into four sections.1. Practitioners? Notes (Blue Pages; Numbered B1, B2, etc.) ? If information seems to conflict with the Rules pages, the Rules pages control.2. Rules of Citation and Style (R.1 ? R.9) ? These rules cover formatting do?s and don?ts (e.g., capitalization and typeface) as well as general structure.3. Specific Citation Rules (R.10 ? R.21) ? These rules contain citation formats for particular sources such as cases, statutes, and law reviews.4. Tables and Abbreviations (T.1 ? T.16) ? These pages feature lists of abbreviations for terms that appear in your citation.The Bluebook must be purchased through the publisher. You can purchase an online subscription that costs about $40.00 per year or the print version which is also about $40.00 for the 20th Edition. In the EGCC Paralegal Program, you will find Bluebook citation information in your course materials for Legal Research and Writing I & II.Here are a series of podcasts to teach you about the basics of Bluebook citation: Video Tutorials: INTRODUCTION TO CITATION AND BLUEBOOK: 1. This is a newly updated citation podcast, using the 20th edition of The Bluebook. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jDTTFMejCY#action=share 2. This video is for basic case citation, case name format, and reporter information. Rules 10, 10.2, 10.3.1(b). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9FcW9ILQ-I#action=share 3. This video explains how to add court, jurisdiction, and date information to a basic case cite. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T89EMGr3eNk#action=share This document has been checked for accessibility pursuant to the Americans With Disabilities Act , Legal Citation & Research: The Bluebook & Nexis Uni Susan Maruca, JD, MAParalegal Program Director, Eastern Gateway Community CollegeOverview The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation is a style guide that is the most widely used system of legal citation in the legal community of the United States. It is typically referred to as the Bluebook. The Bluebook style of citation includes a uniform system used by law practitioners to site case law, statutory law and other legislative materials, state constitutions, the United States Constitution, administrative law, and legal books or reports, journals, magazines, digital/Internet Sources and international materials. While the Bluebook covers both state and federal law, some courts require their own system of citation that takes precedence over the Bluebook system of citation. While the Bluebook includes how to United States Supreme Court cases, the United States Supreme Court writes its opinions using its own system of citation. Publication InformationPublication Information: The Bluebook was first published somewhere between 1920 and 1926 and the online version was first offered in 2008. The Bluebook is in its 20th edition. Like all other systems of citation such as MLA, APA, CSE, etc., the Bluebook is revised periodically to keep up with the everchanging ways that the law is delivered to the legal community from primarily print publications to the digitizing of publications for online consumption. The publishers of the Bluebook are: The Harvard Law Review Association, the University of Pennsylvania Law Review and the Yale Law Review Journal Company, Inc.How to Access Bluebook CitationLegal Community Generally, the Bluebook is a publication secured by Copyright and is purchased by practitioners in the legal community. An annual subscription including online and print is available for under $40.00 through the Bluebook website: www.legalbluebook.com. Subscribers to Lexis or Westlaw, the primary online databases used by practitioners in the legal community for research, can access information about how to cite legal materials using the Bluebook style of citation.Students: Nexis Uni Colleges, universities and law schools have libraries that subscribe to numerous online databases including Westlaw and Lexis. Lexis now provides a student version of its database, Nexis Uni, to subscribing colleges, universities, and law schools. Eastern Gateway Community College is currently a subscriber to Nexis Uni. EGCC students therefore can access this database free of cost through the student?s online library account. For more information about how to access an EGCC library account, refer to your Loud Cloud course menu or the EGCC website: www.egcc.edu/library/ How to Access Nexis Uni through EGCC Library1. Go to the EGCC website: www.egcc.edu 2. Select ?Click here to go to Gateway?3. Under ?Important Links? select ?Library?4. Select ?Search EGCC Library Resources.? 5. You can locate Nexis Uni by selecting ?OhioLink? or you can select the quick-link ?Nexis Uni? under ?Other E-Resources.? You may receive an ?Off Campus-Access? prompt that asks for your last name and password. 6. Passwords are entered in the following format: first initial capitalized, last name with first letter capitalized, last four digits of your student ID#: JSmith12347. Your last name and passwords are case sensitive. Do not use your social security number.8. If you have difficulty logging in, email [email protected] 9. On the home screen of Nexi Uni, you can select ?Help? in the upper right-hand corner of the home screen.10. Select the folder ?Getting Started with Nexis Uni? to review basic features of the database. The ?Help? folder also provides information for how to search the database and offers a support page with video tutorials. The direct link for that support page is: https://www-lexisnexis-com.egcc.ohionet.org/en-us/support/nexis-uni/default.page?lbu=US&locale=en_US&audience=all 11. You can also find video tutorials for practically anything that you?d like to do within this database on YouTube. 12. Working with this professional database requires time and practice. Over time and with practice, research skills will develop to the necessary level for successful legal research in college and in the legal workforce. How to Find Bluebook Citations in Nexis Uni Case Law1. Once you find the case you are looking for and select it, you will see the Nexis Uni Citation at the top of the page. Immediately under the case name you can select, ?Export Citation.? You will then see a box ?Citation Export? and underneath a prompt asking, ?What?s your selected citation format?? You can scroll through your options and select ?Bluebook? and the Nexis Uni citation will reconfigure to a Bluebook citation. 2. The option ?Copy to Clipboard? below the citation allows you to copy and paste the citation into your own file. Bluebook citation note: Bluebook Rule 18.2.1 clarifies that it is not necessary to include the URL/Internet address at the end of a citation for official versions of cases or statutes. Therefore, if locating case or statutory law on Nexis Uni, you should exclude web addresses from your citation.Statutory Law1. When searching for a statute or administrative law on the home page of Nexis Uni under ?Guided Search,? you will be asked ?What are you interested in?? You will select ?A Publication.?2. If you know the name of the Code or other statutory text you are looking for, it is easier to skip the prompt asking you to ?Search for something specific?? and just type into the ?Find publication? the name of your source. As you type, Nexis Uni will offer options as to the texts in the database for you to select.3. Select ?Search.? Select the statute or other legislation you are looking for. 4. Immediately under the statutory title offered by Nexis Uni, you can select, ?Export Citation.? You will then see a box ?Citation Export? and underneath a prompt asking, ?What?s your selected citation format?? You can scroll through your options and select ?Bluebook? and the Nexis Uni citation will reconfigure to a Bluebook citation. 5. The option ?Copy to Clipboard? below the citation allows you to copy and paste the citation into your own file. Bluebook citation note: Bluebook Rule 18.2.1 clarifies that it is not necessary to include the URL/Internet address at the end of a citation for official versions of cases or statutes. Therefore, if locating case or statutory law on Nexis Uni, you should exclude web addresses from your citation.,SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF LAW LIBRARIES 2011 Locating the Law A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians ? Fifth Edition, Revised P U B L I C A C C E S S T O L E G A L I N F O R M A T I O N C O M M I T T E E ©2009, 2011 Southern California Association of Law Libraries Locating the Law A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians Fifth edition, Revised Edited by June Kim Southern California Association of Law Libraries 2011 Public Access to Legal Information (PALI) Committee, Southern California Association of Law Libraries June Kim, Chair 2010-2011 COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Joan Allen-Hart, Judy K. Davis, Catherine Deane, Esther Eastman, Michelle Gorospe, Curtis Jones, Jennifer Lentz, Janine Liebert David McFadden, Patrick Meyer, and Lisa Shultz i Forward The law ?should surely be accessible at all times and to everyone. ?Franz Kafka The Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL) Committee on Public Access to Legal Information (PALI) is charged with providing consulting services and related educational programs to public and other non-law libraries offering open access to legal information. Public access to legal information is extremely important in today?s rapidly changing legal environment. In recognition of the public?s need to know their legal rights and how statutes, administrative regulations, and judicial cases affect their lives, SCALL is pleased to present the fifth edition of Locating the Law: A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians, 2009. This publication, as each of the earlier editions pointed out, is not intended to replace a detailed legal research guide nor is it to be a substitute for the advice of a licensed attorney. Locating the Law is intended to provide basic information about California and federal legal materials: what they are, how they are organized, and how to use them. The full text of the fifth edition of Locating the Law will be available free of charge on the SCALL Web site. For economic and environmental reasons the publication will no longer be produced in print format. Additionally, the electronic only version will make updating more effective and efficient. Web site addresses have been supplied for most of the materials discussed in each chapter. Further, when Locating the Law is viewed over the Internet, readers will be able to find sources of information almost instantly by clicking on the hyperlinked text provided throughout this publication. As used in this handbook, Internet access means electronically available. When commercially available Internet services are described within, they are identified as fee-based services. As a member of SCALL for fifteen years (1992-2007) and former PALI chair, I know that previous editions of this handbook have been used by librarians both within and outside of California and have assisted paralegals, law students, legal administrative assistants, attorneys and others. The editor and authors hope the fifth edition will continue to be an important resource for locating legal information. Readers with questions, comments and suggestions for revisions may use the Contact Us link on the Locating the Law page at http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/locating.htm. http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/locating.htm? LOCATING THE LAW, FIFTH EDITION ii With your help, the members of the PALI Committee will strive to keep this new online edition as up-to-date as possible. October 2009 Ruth J. Hill Director of Library Services & Associate Professor of Law Oliver B. Spellman Law Library Southern University Law Center 56 Roosevelt Steptoe Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70813 iii Preface The Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL) Committee on Public Access to Legal Information (PALI) is pleased to present the revised fifth edition of Locating of Law: A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians. The revision of the fifth edition of Locating the Law was completed in November 2011. Because most of the edits involved updating links or deleting obsolete resources, the Committee decided that this version of Locating the Law did not include enough substantive changes to qualify as a new edition. A couple of changes, however, do merit a mention here. New PALI member Janine Liebert suggested several new titles to add to Chapter 10: Bibliography of Self-Help Resources. In addition, the list of common abbreviations in law previously included at the end of Chapter 2: How to Read a Legal Citation is now Appendix B. We hope that providing this handy list in its new location as a separate appendix will make it more accessible to researchers. I would like to thank the PALI members who updated the 2009 versions of their chapters: David McFadden, Joan Allen-Hart, Patrick Meyer, Lisa Schultz, Jennifer Lentz, and Esther Eastman. I would also like to acknowledge the assistance provided by Judy K. Davis and several new members of PALI, Catherine Deane, Michelle Gorospe, Curtis Jones and Janine Liebert. Also, PALI thanks Ramon Barajas for his technical assistance. On behalf of the 2010-2011 Committee on Public Access to Legal Information, I hope that the revised fifth edition of Locating the Law will be a useful resource to public librarians in California and elsewhere. November 2011 June Kim Chair, Public Access to Legal Information Committee (2010-2011) Southern California Association of Law Libraries LOCATING THE LAW, FIFTH EDITION, 2011 iv v Acknowledgments The 2008-2009 Public Access to Legal Information (PALI) Committee is pleased to present the fifth edition of Locating the Law: A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians. The new edition reflects the hard work, diligence and expertise of over a dozen California law librarians, all of whom volunteered their time to this project. Given that eight years have passed since the last edition, it should not surprise readers to know that the changes to this publication are extensive. The Committee had its work cut out for it and, I believe, rose to the challenge. As editor, I had the privilege of working with all of the members of the Committee. Especially during the last four months, 1 when the editing process was most intensive, I became exceedingly familiar with each person?s contributions to this publication. I hope to convey my appreciation of the Committee?s accomplishments here, as well as in the quality of the final product, which I hope meets the expectations of the Committee members. The chapters and appendices are excellent as separate work, but they are even better together, in what I hope is a cohesive whole. The chapter and appendix authors are Joan Allen-Hart, Laura A. Cadra, Karla Castetter, Esther Eastman, June Kim, Jennifer Lentz, David McFadden, Patrick Meyer, and Lisa Shultz. A detailed list is in the table below. SECTION/CHAPTER AUTHOR TITLE/AFFILIATION PREFACE Ruth Hill Director of Library Services & Assoc. Professor of Law, Southern University Law Center (Baton Rouge, LA) ACKNOWLEDGMENTS June Kim Senior Reference Librarian, UCLA School of Law 1 Mid-May 2009 through September 2009. LOCATING THE LAW, FIFTH EDITION vi CHAPTER 1: Introduction Karla Castetter Library Director, Thomas Jefferson School of Law CHAPTER 2: How to Read a Legal Citation David McFadden Senior Reference Librarian, South- western Law School CHAPTER 3: Basic Legal Research Techniques Joan Allen-Hart Assistant Director, Retired, San Diego County Public Law Library CHAPTER 4: Legal Reference vs. Legal Advice Joan Allen-Hart Assistant Director, Retired, San Diego County Public Law Library CHAPTER 5: California Law Laura A. Cadra Head of Reference/Foreign & Int?l Law Librarian, Loyola Law School Los Angeles CHAPTER 6: Bibliography of California Resources Patrick Meyer Associate Library Director, Thomas Jefferson School of Law CHAPTER 7: Federal Law Karla Castetter Library Director, Thomas Jefferson School of Law CHAPTER 8: Bibliography of Federal Law Resources June Kim Senior Reference Librarian, UCLA School of Law LOCATING THE LAW, FIFTH EDITION vii CHAPTER 9: Assisting Self- Represented Litigants in California Laura A. Cadra and June Kim Head of Reference/Foreign & Int?l Law Librarian, Loyola Law School Los Angeles (Laura) and Senior Reference Librarian, UCLA School of Law (June) CHAPTER 10: Bibliography of Self-Help Resources Lisa Schultz Faculty Services/Reference Librarian, Loyola Law School Los Angeles CHAPTER 11: Availability, Accessibility and Maintenance of Legal Collections Joan Allen-Hart Assistant Director, Retired, San Diego County Public Law Library CHAPTER 12: Major Law Publishers Jennifer Lentz Head of Collection Development & Reference Librarian, UCLA School of Law APPENDIX A: Glossary of Legal Terms June Kim Senior Reference Librarian, UCLA School of Law APPENDIX B: California County Law Libraries Esther Eastman Reference Librarian, LA Law Library APPENDIX C: California Law Schools Karla Castetter Library Director, Thomas Jefferson School of Law LOCATING THE LAW, FIFTH EDITION viii PALI Committee members, not included in the above list of authors, and who assisted in the editing process are Judy K. Davis, Head of Access Services, USC Law Library, and Tammy Pettinato, former reference librarian at UCLA Law Library. They acted as two extra pair of eyes, for which I am grateful. Special thanks also to David McFadden, a chapter author, who volunteered to assist in the editing process. I also want to thank Ruth Hill, former PALI chair, who graciously agreed to write the preface to the fifth edition. Ruth was a long-time member of SCALL before she moved to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to become library director of Southern University Law Center. Moreover, two people deserve special mention: Jessica Wimer, 2008-2009 President of SCALL, for her encouragement and support and Ramon Barajas, the SCALL Webmaster, for his technical skills and expertise. Last but not least, many, many thanks to Laura Cadra, who provided invaluable assistance to me during the past four months. I consulted with Laura on all issues for which I needed a second opinion?from structure and organization of the chapters, formatting, whether to include or exclude information, and much more. She also helped in the editing process by reviewing several of the chapters. In addition, she graciously agreed to co-author the new chapter, Assisting Self-Represented Litigants in California (Chapter 9). On behalf of the chapter authors, the PALI Committee members, Ruth Hill, Jessica Wimer, and Ramon Barajas, I hope that the fifth edition of Locating the Law: A Handbook for Non-Law Librarians will be a useful resource to public librarians in California and elsewhere. June Kim, Chair SCALL Public Access to Legal Information Committee 2007-2009 http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/locating/ch9.pdf? vii Table of Contents FORWARD (2009) ???????????????????????????????????????????. i PREFACE ???????????????????????????????????????????????. iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS (2009) ????????????????????????????????????. v CHAPTER 1: Introduction ??????????????????????????????????? 1 CHAPTER 2: How to Read a Legal Citation ????????????????????????.. 13 CHAPTER 3: Basic Legal Research Techniques ??????????????????????? 21 CHAPTER 4: Legal Reference vs. Legal Advice ???????????????????????. 46 CHAPTER 5: California Law ????????????????????????????????? 54 CHAPTER 6: Bibliography of California Resources ????????????????????. 69 CHAPTER 7: Federal Law ?????????????????????.

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